Addition Worksheets

Welcome to the addition worksheets page at Math-Drills.com where we will add to your learning experience in many positive ways! On this page, you will find Addition worksheets from addition facts and two-digit addition to column addition and addition with games. In the first section, we've included a few addition printables that should help out the beginning student. Teaching addition facts is best done with some interesting teaching strategies.

Some teachers and parents use addition manipulatives to help students understand the basic addition facts. For example, adding groups of "Apple Jacks" (a breakfast cereal) by counting will quickly lead students to understand the concepts of addition. By the way, it is important to note that addition skills follow naturally from counting skills, so if your student has difficulty counting, perhaps you should focus on that first.

The next section includes our popular "Five Minute Frenzies". Some people call these mad minutes or timed drills. They are meant to be timed to add a little more excitement to practicing addition facts. They are ideally used to increase a student's ability to recall addition facts quickly which has all sorts of benefits later in their school life including preventing the high school teacher complaining about "how their students can't even add single-digit numbers without using a calculator."

As you move down the page, you will notice that we have prepared some good old-fashioned math worksheets for practicing single-digit addition to multi-digit addition and a few other interesting addition worksheets. Please use the menu below to jump to a specific section.

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General Use Printables

Use the printable addition tables below to learn addition facts or the blank printable addition tables to practice addition facts.

Addition Facts Table Blank Addition Facts Table Addition Facts Table With Zero Blank Addition Facts Table With Zero Left-Handed Addition Facts Table Left-Handed Blank Addition Facts Table All Addition Facts Tables Addition Facts Tables With One Fact at a time highlighted

Five Minute Frenzy Charts

Five minute frenzy charts are 10 by 10 grids for addition fact practice. In each square, students write the sum of the column number and the row number. They try to complete the chart in less than five minutes and score 98 percent or better. Of course, you don't necessarily have to use that rule of thumb as students come in all sorts of configurations. We would recommend setting personal goals for students based on an initial (or diagnostic) test. If they are banging their head against the wall after a couple of minutes with only a few questions done, they really shouldn't be completing a timed addition facts drill at the moment. They still have some learning to do. We would recommend breaking out the Apple Jacks at this point. If they blast through the questions in 1.5 minutes and get almost all of them correct, they are probably ready for something a little more challenging. We would recommend breaking out the base ten blocks and working on some two-digit questions at this point.




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Single-Digit Addition Worksheets

Try using counters for single-digit addition. Make the counters fun and healthy with cereal pieces. For questions involving regrouping, try using base ten blocks, so students become familiar with these essential manipulatives.

Addition Questions Arranged Horizontally


Addition Questions Arranged Vertically

Two-Digit Addition Worksheets

Use base ten blocks to develop students conceptual understanding of addition. Try a mental math strategy where students add from left to right. E.g. 34 + 78 would be 30 + 70 = 100, 100 + 4 = 104, 104 + 8 = 112. Don't forget about using estimation with these worksheets.

Addition Questions Arranged Horizontally

Addition Questions Arranged Vertically



Three-Digit Addition Worksheets

Various Multi-Digit Addition Worksheets

Column Addition





Addition with Games

For the adding with playing cards worksheets, a Jack is counted as 11, a Queen as 12, a King as 13 and an Ace as 1.

Adding Complements of Numbers

Finding complements of numbers can help students a great deal in developing mental arithmetic skills and to further their understanding of number.

Adding Doubles

Using an adding doubles strategy can help students to process addition questions more quickly using mental math. To use this strategy, students must recognize that the two numbers are close to the same value (usually by one or two). They also must recognize by how much and whether it is greater or less than the first addend. A typical dialogue with the question, 15 + 16, might be, "I see that the second number is greater than the first number by 1. If I double the first number and add 1, I will get my answer. 15 doubled is 30 plus one is 31. 15 + 16, therefore, is 31."