Graph Paper

Welcome to the graph paper page at Math-Drills.com where learning can be coordinated in a grid pattern! We have included Graph paper, dot paper, isometric paper and coordinate grid paper in both metric and U.S./Imperial measurements. Graph or grid paper may be used for many purposes such as: graphing, mapping, counting, multiplying, adding, and measuring.

Due to the wide variety of printers, the printable graph paper may or may not print out with precision. In Adobe Reader, change Page Scaling to "None" when printing to get the most precise scaling. You will see this option after you choose to print.

Metric Graph Paper

This paper is for those who are used to using the Metric system or those who want things measured using the Metric system. The grey lined paper is most useful if you need to draw overtop of the existing lines and highlight your own figures. For example, for a measurement unit, rectangles of different sizes could be outlined in a word problem like the following: "Draw as many rectangles as you can with whole number dimensions that have an area of 36 square centimeters."

U.S. & Imperial Graph Paper

This paper uses fractions of inches for those who are used to measuring using the U.S. or Imperial system of measurement. Perhaps you might consider using this graph paper for learning multiplication facts. To multiply 5 by 6, for example, a student would make a rectangle that is five squares by six squares and find out how many squares were contained within. You might also solve a problem like the following using grid paper, "Find the area of forest on a rectangular property that is 9 miles by 7 miles if the entire property is forested except for an estate with a house and open area that is 3 miles by 2 miles."

Metric Dot Paper

Dot paper can be useful in a variety of mathematical situations. For example, it is quite useful for drawing side views of connecting cube structures or other rectangular based figures. One very interesting use of dot paper is to find the area of irregular polygons using Pick's Formula (named after Georg Alexander Pick). You could decompose an irregular polygon into regular polygons, find the area of each polygon and add the areas, or you could use the much easier Pick's Formula which is to add the number of interior dots to half of the boundary dots and subtract one. You can see more about Pick's Formula and some examples at Wikipedia.

U.S. and Imperial Dot Paper

Dot paper can actually be used for just about anything for which grid paper can be used. Dot paper is grid paper without the line segments in between the vertices. Some people prefer dot paper as the page is less busy and allows better definition of anything that is drawn on the page.

Isometric Paper

Isometric dot paper is often used for sketching three-dimensional cube structures. With a little shading, the structures can look quite nice.

Portrait Orientation

Landscape Orientation

Coordinate Grid Paper

Coordinate grid paper is used for plotting points in four quadrants on a coordinate plane. It can also be used for transformations that involve more than one quadrant. Even those are two common uses, your imagination can lead you to other uses including just about anything that you can do with regular grid paper.

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